Travel Physical Therapy Career Guide: Step 4 – Know who’s going with you.

If you are planning on traveling far from home for your short-term therapy contract job, then a lot of decisions you will need to make in your travel rehab career will depend on who is coming with you if anyone. This is why it is important to evaluate if you are going to be traveling alone or with someone.

If you are planning on traveling far from home for your short-term therapy contract job, then a lot of decisions you will need to make in your travel rehab career will depend on who is coming with you if anyone. This is why it is important to evaluate if you are going to be traveling alone or with someone.

Is your spouse or significant other is coming with you? A lot of this depends on either the stage of life your spouse is in and/or their occupation. If they stay at home, are retired, have a seasonal job, like a teacher, or a mobile job like a freelance graphic designer, it is going to be easy for them to travel with you and can make your travel therapy job a lot more fun to take someone with you. And if it is your first travel therapy assignment it may be nice to have the comfort of a loved one with you as you get used to the change.

What about your kids? Obviously this depends a lot on your situation and their age since childcare and school is always a concern, but if your spouse or another family member is coming with you it is going to be easier to arrange for your kids to come with you, since they will probably be able to watch them and maybe even home school them. And if it your assignment is during the summer months then imagine the learning and fun opportunities waiting for them in a new town for three months.

Don’t forget about pets. Taking them along with you is also a great way to prevent getting lonely during a travel therapy assignment.

You can also try to travel with another travel therapist if you can both find assignments in the same hospital or skilled nursing facility or at least in the same city. This is a great option for first time travelers if it works out, since you can both help each other out with the new challenges that a travel therapy job can present, like being away from home and having to learn fast on the job.

Or you can go alone, which is the norm and offers so many advantages too, like the chance to do what you want to do in your free time, the chance to be by yourself and reflect and of course to take a “workation” and just get away from it all.

Featured Travel Physical Therapist Job in North Carolina

  • Travel PT’s (Physical Therapists) are needed for a 13 week assignment to start ASAP in a Hospital Setting located in Eden, North Carolina.
  • This is one of the most popular states to travel in with lots of things to do and beautiful scenery.
  • This position won’t be open long.
  • Great Benefits and Pay!
  • Please call Medical Solutions at (866) 633-3548 to speak with a Career Consultant regarding this travel assignment!

To learn more about this travel occupational therapist job click here.

Enjoy the drive to your travel therapy job!

A lot of travel therapists choose to stay close to home and take a local short-term contract instead of a more traditional travel therapy assignment in a new city, which lets them stay close to their friends and family. But for those that choose to take a 13 week travel therapy assignment in a new city the great the travel therapy road trip awaits them.

A road trip in the model of a college road trip to your travel therapy job is probably not a good idea, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be one of the best parts of your assignment. With a little time and planning your road trip can be full of adventure, stories and cheesy tourist traps.

Here are two road trip resources we have found for you to plan your trip.

Road Trip America.com, which offers tools like:

  • A Fuel Cost Calculator
  • The Great American Road Trip Forum
  • Routes, Destinations, Events & Road Food Articles
  • Equipment, Driving & Preparation Tips
  • Book & Map Recommendations and Audio Book Reviews
  • Links to the Best Web Resources
  • Tips for Renting an RV & Planning an RV Vacation
  • Point, Click and Drive! – A collection of web based automated road trip planning programs
  • And, Caution: Funny Signs Ahead

And RoadTripPlanning.com that provides:

  • Articles
  • Car camping
  • Gear
  • Games
  • Road trip planner
  • Driving directions

So don’t miss out on one of the best parts of a travel therapy assignment, take the time to have an awesome road trip.

Looking for love in all the right places.

Single and loving it or single and hating it? It’s safe to assume most of us who are single would fall into either category. I would say it all depends on your priorities and what you want to accomplish with your time on this planet. Some of you may be jaded with the idea of finding that one true love while others are relishing the opportunities to meet so many different people and simply enjoying their company.

There are so many ways one can look at the single scene. I won’t input any of my own personal experiences, (we’ll save that for my memoirs!) but I can tell you that living in the same city your whole life can really limit you to exposure of what else is certainly out there. Not that it’s a bad thing, but there are 6,809,383,757 people in the world as of today and 307,946,234 people in the United States alone. Surely one of them is meant to be, right? So what’s this got to do with being a traveling therapist? Well, for one, being a traveler means just that. You can leave your homebase for 3 months at a time and travel to all these different cities you may have never had the chance to see before, all thanks to your short-term contract work in travel therapy.

Working in rehab and therapy usually entails pretty normal working hours, like 9 to 5. This would allow you to take advantage of the nightlife and culture of whatever city you’ll be dwelling in for the next few months. So there’s no excuse that you’re working crazy hours and that the only people you meet are street sweepers and various other night owls. You’ll have as good a chance as the next person to get out there and meet all kinds of folks. In July, Forbes magazine released an article and Top 40 list of the best cities for singles in the United States. There are of course your usual suspects like New York City, Boston and Chicago, but there are also some “sleeper” cities in there that really surprised me, like Milwaukee! Milwaukee, really? I guess so. Find out for yourself and see if there’s any cities that made the list that you’d like to visit. Think of it as your “Little Black Book” for dating by city.

Here’s the link to the Best Cities for Singles 2009 article in Forbes. Maybe your city made the list and you’re just having bad luck? Or maybe there’s a city listed that you’ve always wanted to visit and now you’ll have all the more reason to go. If by chance you do meet your soulmate because you read this article or post, please share. I’d like to think I was a part of that! Now get out there and get to work, on your traveling assignment as well as your love life.

Back to school! Internship time

therapy internship

It is that time of year again, college is starting back up, which means many of you will be starting in on your clinical internships. Your internship lets you experience clinical opportunities gain experience in your area, such as acute care, neurologic rehabilitation, sports medicine, geriatrics, etc.

Having that kind of experience can be a huge difference maker when employers are looking at the resumes of pt, pta, ot, cota and slp candidates. With all else being equal, employers, both for perm positions or travel therapy jobs, are going to look at what kind of experience you have, what you did at your internship and what you did to go beyond the basic requirements.

I ran across this blog post about the clinical education of PTs this morning and how it is flawed by Johnnie May at the Physical Therapist Rover blog and wondered what you thought about it. The post is a little old, but what about you current therapists, do you feel like you got the best learning experience from your clinical internships? What would you change?

Your one chance to make a good impression.

Life of a traveling therapist is a bit different than that of a traveling nurse. The hours, the workload and even the workplace all differ from one another, but there is one aspect of the traveling career that both share. Obviously you’re changing locations rather frequently and you’re meeting all kinds of new people and you have to able to adapt rather quickly. So what do you think these new faces think of you when you first walk in the door?

Your appearance, demeanor, the sound of your voice and ability to empathize all play a major role in your professional image. If the way you carry yourself becomes an issue shortly after your arrival to your new travel therapy job, well expect a long and arduous assignment. In order to ensure that your transition into these new assignments goes swimmingly, might I suggest some areas to work on to improve your professional image.

  • Professional work atmosphere and interactions
  • General appearance
  • Cooperation and team mentality
  • Professional responsibility

Being the new kid on the block is never the easiest thing. All you want is the respect of your peers and there are a few things to keep in mind while on assignment. If a situation arises in which you have an opinion about a work situation or even personal issues, be sure and remove yourself from those who may be within earshot. Also, make sure to you don’t exhibit any questionable behavior in front of them. Besides respecting peers and their space, you must also show your respect towards the facility and its contents. You are a healthcare professional and your care doesn’t always have to be aimed at the patients, you can apply this to your surroundings as well.

So what’s the first thing people notice when you walk into a room? If you guessed what you’re wearing or how you look, you’re probably right. Your appearance greatly affects the way your skills are perceived, undoubtedly. You have a respectable profession, so act and dress like it. Wear what you think would be appropriate to any age