The Most Important List of Books for Rehab Specialists

BookShelfWhile out on your next traveling assignment you may find yourself with some downtime and there are so many ways to spend that time. Depending on where you are located you could take in a round of golf or catch some rays at the local beach or perhaps you’d like to do some exploring by hiking around a nearby mountain range. Yes, your options are endless when you take on a traveling rehab or therapy position, but what about the time when you just want to kick back and relax. That’s the time you could kick back and relax on the deck and cozy up to a good book. Over at MikeReinold.com is an “Essential Reading List” aimed at all things rehab. Mike states, “The goal was to include books that I felt were influential in my development and clinical practice.” Maybe you have some of your own books that you’d like to share that were also very significant in your development or perhaps turned you on to the idea of becomming a therapist or rehab specialist.

iPhones for the mobile lifestyle.

Unless you were like me up until about a year ago, I was without a cell phone. Don’t say it, I know, it’s nice to be a part of the 21st century. I’m sure there are the rare few out there and I commend you but I cannot picture myself without one nowadays. I thought to myself, why just get a phone, I want the best there is out there and I settled on the iPhone from Mac/Apple. It was by far the best purchase of 2008 for me, (the house comes in a close second.) It’s quite the tool and I personally think there is nothing else out there that can come close to matching it’s power and capabilities. There is one small qualm I have with it and is aimed more at the service provider AT&T. You see I live in Omaha, Nebraska, and we have a modest population of around 1 million if you count the surrounding burbs and whatnot. Well the problem is that I live in the heart of the city, midtown and at my home I get “No Service.” Ridiculous and I’ll save that for another time.

19194652I’m sure can already guess how a “smartphone” like an iPhone can help you on your next therapy or rehab assignment. Recently Mac released the 3rd generation iPhone 3G s complete with GPS, video, tethering and all sorts of other goodies, so many that I’d have to write another post about it. Again, we’ll save it for some other time. You see, having a phone like this in your pocket is so many things in one and you wouldn’t really need to bring your desktop or laptop computer wherever you go.

You can access your emails from many different accounts and have them all sync up in one place, or you can check out what all your friends and family are doing and saying on Facebook. You can map out the route to your next short-term contract assignment and follow along, send pictures of all the places you stop along the way and on and on and on. It seems there isn’t much the iPhone can’t do and a few of the other phones out there have the same capabilities but they just don’t hold the prestige of the iPhone, in my opinion. There are loads of applications (apps) you can load too. There is something for everyone, from games to medical information, it’s all there. Here’s a list of essential apps for the traveler and another of accessories for your iPhone essential to travel.

So you see, all you need is a phone and you’ll be well on your way to making the most out of your assignments and keeping in touch with the life you left behind at home. Good luck and happy travels to you all.

Packing for your travel therapy job

packing for a travel therapist job

Creating a packing checklist for three months can seem like a pretty daunting task, but now packing for your short-term travel therapy job just got a lot easier thanks to Packing List Online.com.

It is a simple tool that gathers some basic information like location, weather and length of your trip and some more advanced information like how you are getting there and what you will be doing while you there. It even asks how old you are, are you bringing pets or anyone else.

Once it has gathered all your information, it spits out an extensive packing list that you can email yourself, print copy and add to an existing list. It is really that the simple. I tested it and it seems to be pretty accurate and exhaustive, it even lists items like food, toiletries, hobby based items, clothes and even stuff to take on the drive. Give it a try.

Why should you work in a skilled nursing facility?

Senior and physical therapist Clowning Around

There are a lot of PT, PTA, OT, COTA and SLP short-term jobs in skilled nursing facility (nursing home) settings and they provide a unique set of benefits that you may not see at some of the other settings for rehab and therapist careers, settings like the acute care/hospital setting, outpatient setting, home health and in-patient rehabilitation setting.

Again bringing you our quick 1,2,3 overview (plus 1), here are four of the benefits of working in a nursing home:

  1. See your patients improve – In settings like a acute care/hospital setting you may only see your patients for a few days and thus never see their progression
  2. Great work schedule – Compared to outpatient settings where the pace can be frantic with multiple patients receiving different parts of a treatment and early and late hour appointments
  3. Less documentation – Working in a SNF requires an evaluation for a patient with just a weekly note
  4. Less boredom – In a nursing home setting you will, in most situations get to work not only with other therapists in your discipline, but you will also get to work with other types of therapists. Plus you are going to get the chance to expand the types of patients and injuries and conditions you treat.

What’s the deal?

19095553In my last post I listed some questions you should ask your staffing agencies before you take a short-term contract rehab or therapy job to avoid a disastrous assignment. In this second post of the Ultimate Traveling Rehab & Therapy Questions we are looking at questions you should ask about the specifics of when you are on assignment.

Traveling Rehab & Therapy Questions List 2: On Assignment

  • How many hours of my short-term contract are guaranteed?
  • Are my hours guaranteed?
  • Have other therapists worked at the facility before?
  • Who do I talk to when I have problems with my short-term contract assignment?
  • What type of faciltiy will I be working in during my short-term contract?
  • What shifts will I work?
  • Will I be required to be on-call? If so, what is the on-call pay?
  • What about extensions?
  • Is there a maximum amount of extensions allowed?
  • What happens when I’m sick?
  • Can I make up shifts?
  • Can I extend my contract if I get sick?

Again, I am sure I didn’t get them all so help us build the ultimate list of Traveling Rehab & Therapy Questions by listing any questions you have found useful during your travel therapy and rehab careers.

You got questions, hopefully they have the answers.

16474952The idea of a traveling for therapy and rehab jobs is a fairly new concept. Though it has been around for some time, not many know how to get involved and worse yet, may not know what to do to prepare yourself for the short-term contract assignment. Perhaps you’ve heard of others who have ventured out and loved every second and found their living quarters to be top-notch. Or maybe you’ve heard some who returned with unfavorable results, like the provided housing was “nestled along the shores of a beautiful lake,” when in reality it was a cabin next to a pond full of who knows what! My hope is that all your adventures lead you to the former. This can certainly happen but it will take some legwork from you.

It’s rare that you would make a major purchase, sight unseen, so why would you take a job in a city you’ve never been to and have no idea where you’re living or where you’ll be working. That’s just disaster waiting to happen. So what should you do? Ask questions and plenty of them. Here’s a series of The Ultimate List of Traveling Rehab & Therapy Questions that should help you learn more about the agency you are working with up front. Finding out as many answers to these questions will definitely help you in molding your perfect assignment. Try them out yourself. Have you thought of any other questions you need an answer to?

Short-Term Contract Questions List 1: Housing

  • Is housing furnished? (bed, night stand, couches, tables, etc.)
  • Are utilities paid? Up to how much do they pay? Which Utilities are not paid for?
  • What kind of housing do you offer? Is it private or shared?
  • Is it an apartment or house?
  • Can I have Pets?
  • How close is your housing to the hospital?
  • Does the travel nursing assignment allow me to bring my spouse or significant other, children, pets) Are there charges if I do?
  • When doing housing through your company can I have a part in choosing our own apartment so we can maybe negotiate with the apartment complex for even better deals?
  • Is there a housing package for things such as the kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom? (ie: pots/pans, utensils, towels, sheets?)
  • Does the housing you offer come with washer and dryers? If so where is it located? (eg: my room or within the complex?) If in the complex, do I have to pay to use it?
  • What about phone service, Internet (wireless), cable?  Are they included or do I pay for those?
  • How much sooner than my assignment start and end date am I allowed to move in and out?
  • Am I able to see where my room would be located in an apartment layout? Such as close to streets, parks and which floors?
  • Does the housing I am offered come with A/C and/or heat or would I have to find a way to take care of those needs myself?
  • Am I able to know the actual square feet of my apartment before and also see an exact layout of where the rooms are located to make sure the sq. ft. is right for me?
  • Do you offer an extended stay option instead?

Hopefully the answers to these questions will get you the housing you deserve and pictured. All it takes is being a little proactive and you will make your traveling career better than you could have ever imagined.