Bring Your Best Four Legged Friend With You On Your Next Assignment

Did you know that there are over 46 million households with at least one pooch at home? That’s around 72 million dogs in total and according to a recently released pet census from the American Veterinary Medical Association, cats still greatly outnumber dogs as pets, with 82 million felines, up from 71 million in 2001. Our total pet population has reached a record high of just over 282 million pets. Nearly 60% of all home have one pet with 21% having five or more. So what do these stats tell you? America loves their pets and who wouldn’t? Did you see the face of the pooch in the picture for this post?

Did you know that there are over 46 million households with at least one pooch at home? That’s around 72 million dogs in total and according to a recently released pet census from the American Veterinary Medical Association, cats still greatly outnumber dogs as pets, with 82 million felines, up from 71 million in 2001.  Our total pet population has reached a record high of just over 282 million pets. Nearly 60% of all home have one pet with 21% having five or more. So what do these stats tell you? America loves their pets and who wouldn’t? Did you see the face of the pooch in the picture for this post?

So you’re thinking of taking your professional skills on the road and accepting a traveling therapy job but you’re afraid you can’t take furry four legged friend with you. There’s no way you’d leave them behind and why would you? There’s no reason to leave your pets behind if you want to take a travel therapy job. If you are working with the right agency, you’ll find that there are many options open to you as a therapist and pet owner, and some staffing companies even offer pet insurance.

There are a few things you might want to consider while traveling with your pets before accepting that next short-term contract job. First off you want to make sure you have addressed the fact that you want your pet to come along with you on assignment. When looking at your options, consider the best cities for pets, especially dogs. Have you heard of DogFriendly.com? Check out the site and come back to it often; it provides highway guides, rest stop and park reviews, outdoor dining info and more—all with dog accompanied travelers in mind. Some things you might want to think about before choosing your next location is:

  • The city should be welcoming of dogs on public transportation
  • The city should not unreasonably regulate dogs if they are leashed
  • The city should have a wide variety of vets to choose from
  • The city should feature parks, open to the public and ideal for dogs to roam

Once you’ve figured out where you want to go, your recruiter will then look into finding you housing (unless you choose to take the per diem) that is accommodating to pets, whether they’re cats, dogs, fish or a snake (ooooo!). Finding your next travel therapy job shouldn’t be so ruff! It’s a fairly simple process and again, most staffing agencies are more than willing to work with you in finding you the ideal job location for you and your pets.

Guest Author: Shannon Wills – Opportunities for Travel Physical Therapists

It’s a great career if you love to travel, see new places and meet new people, but you must be prepared to go where the job takes you when you’re a travel physical therapists. Your job description is the same in that you’re still involved in providing therapy for people who are recovering from an illness or injury, but there’s a small difference. You don’t put down roots in one place; instead, you travel to wherever opportunities beckon from. The US Department of Labor says that the demand for physical therapy jobs is bound to grow by 27 percent until the year 2016, so if you are inclined to pursue this line of work, it’s the best time to do so.

When you choose to become a travel therapist, you probably will be worried about regular work; it’s more like freelancing where you move from one assignment to the other. If you sign up with an agency that connects therapists and patients, you don’t have to think too much about what your next assignment will be. The agency takes care of your housing needs and your travel expenses, and also lines up your next job when this one is drawing to a close.

Choose your agency with care based on its reputation and references from other therapists who have signed up with them. If the company has a dubious reputation, you’re likely to be cheated out of your money or find yourself stuck in a strange place with no job or money. Talk to other therapists who find work through the agency and make your decision accordingly.travel physical therapist and friend enjoying the mountain air

Travel therapy jobs are great because they can pay 10 to 15 percent more than regular therapy jobs, so if you love to travel and see different places, you’re actually getting paid more for free holidays. Besides, you also get a referral bonus when people you refer sign on with the agency too. However, you must ensure that you read and understand the agency’s terms and conditions correctly before you sign on and before you recommend it to others.

One of the downsides of travel therapy is that you don’t find time to put down roots or form solid relationships with people you want to know better. But on the other side of the coin, your network of associates and friends is wide and your resume looks great because of all the experience you gain when you work in different kinds of settings and with different people.

As a travel physical therapist, you will find work in hospitals and other healthcare settings like nursing homes and private clinics, or be asked to work on a personal level with patients who need homecare. Either way, your assignment will match your skills and qualifications, so if you keep updating your abilities, your subsequent assignments will appreciate your efforts in monetary terms.

It’s an exciting job, but be prepared to spend much of your time traveling from place to place and living out of a suitcase because a typical assignment could take from 13 to 26 weeks. Most travel physical therapists are provided with medical benefits, 401(k)s, and other incentives.

By-line: This article is written by Shannon Wills, who writes on the topic of Physical Therapist Assistant Schools. She welcomes your comments at her email id : shannonwills23@gmail.com .

Travel Therapy Salary – Is it really more?

Whether you are just starting out in your therapy career or have been working for twenty years a short-term travel contract can be a great option for you. One of the best parts of a travel therapy job is the chance it gives you to make more money than you would in a permanent position. The question though is how much is the difference. That’s why over the next 5 weeks we will be doing a 5 five part series on the pay for travel therapists versus a permanent therapy or rehab position.physical therapist realizing she is out of money

Here is the schedule of the posts:

Travel Physical Therapy (PT) Salary
Travel Physical Therapy Assistant (PTA) Salary
Travel Occupational Therapy (OT) Salary
Travel Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) Salary
Travel Speech Therapy (SLP) Salary

So check back to see your specialty’s post. To make it easy you can subscribe to the Rehab and Therapy Jobs.com RSS feed here.

More choices. Less hassle.

When you start looking for a travel therapy job one great place to start are job boards and application portals that let you apply to multiple travel rehab and therapy companies at once.

Job boards are excellent if you are looking for a specific job in an area. That way you can choose to work with travel therapy companies that have jobs that meet your criteria, without wasting time getting to know a company and recruiter only to find out that they don’t have a job you want. 

Meanwhile the application portal is a great option if you are just getting your feet wet in a travel therapy career and looking for a company for the first time. They are also a  good way to shop around for a new travel therapy company without having to visit a bunch of websites or call a bunch of companies. Why? Because when you put your resume or information on one of these boards the companies will call you. Trust me. So make sure to use an email address or phone number that you don’t mind being contacted at. i.e. not your work account or phone.

But if you do want to be more selective, some travel therapy application portals let you select which companies you want to work with. And also keep in mind that not every company is on every job board so if you rely on these solely to fine your next travel therapy company you may miss out on some really good companies too.

Some good job boards and application portals in the travel therapy industry are:

Rehab Options.com
AlliedVIP.com
AllTherapyJobs.com
ThirteenWeeks.com
AlliedTravelCareers.com
Physical-Therapy-Jobs.com
TravelRehab.com
AlliedTravelWeb.com
HealthcareTraveler.com

And just for good measure, here are some therapy jobs boards and application portals that are more broad and not focused solely on travel positions:

Therapyjobs.com
PTJobs.com
OTJobs.com
SLPJobs.com
JobsOt.com
AllHealthcareJobs.com
JobsinTherapy.com
MedicalWorkers.com

Don’t fall for the same thing.

August is here and autumn is close behind. The days filled with sunshine begin to shorten and the lush pastures of green slowly begin to fade to hues of  gold and brown. Shoes start to become the norm and the  flip-flops are thrown into the dark corners of our closets (this may be true for some, but for me I try and wear my flippy-floppies for as long as humanly possible – without getting frostbite).

Just like the seasons are beginning to change – so should you. If you’ve never given much thought to becoming a traveling therapist or rehab specialist, I strongly suggest you do. In no other industry are you given the chance to visit so many different places, all the while learning new methods of practice from your peers. You may live in a part of the country that is either this or that when it comes to temperature and weather. Do you not know what it’s like to rake your yard? Whatever you are lacking in seasonal experiences, traveling therapy and rehab jobs will give you the opportunity to be exposed to it all and what better season to start with than Fall?

Take a position anywhere in the Mountain, Central and Eastern time zones and you will surely see the beauty of the autumnal season. The leaves on the trees begin to turn colors from gold to vivacious reds and the air has a fresh, crispness about it. And football. (Go Big Red!)  Oh yes… it is right around the corner! I’m not sure about you, but for me, sitting amongst 84,000+ people in 40 degrees temperatures, screaming and cheering  is what the fall season is all about. So now’s the time to start thinking about where you’d like to spend your time working before the Christmas season is here. OMG-Christmas. I’m writing about Christmas in August. Oy! Besides the football, there are the beautiful vista views that will surely take your breath away and all the other seasonal activities that come along with it.

There are a number of  websites out there that will show you the absolute best places to experience the beauty that fall has to offer. Here are a few I found that may help guide you to new traveling therapy and rehab jobs.

Exploring the Shades of Fall

Top 10 Places for Fall Foliage

Fall Foliage Deals from $100

3 magical ways to turn short-term travel therapy jobs into a long-term travel rehab career

One reservation we hear sometimes about taking a short-term and/or travel therapy contract is that it is not a “real job.” And if by real job you mean you don’t work in the same boring setting day in and day out, then no, travel therapy jobs are “not real jobs.” But, if by “not a real job” you mean that they are not stable and you are afraid you could go months without working then you would be wrong.

3 magical ways to turn short-term travel therapy jobs into a long-term travel rehab career

There are three easy (you could even call them magical) ways you can have all the advantages of a travel therapy career and the stability of a “real job.” First I am going to assume you are already aware of the great pay and benefits available to traveling therapists. OK with that said, here are the three ways. Alacazam!:

  1. Extend your assignments – When you extend on an travel physical therapy for example you could easily only work at two different locations during an entire year, there are fast food workers who love to have that kind of career stability.
  2. Work in your home town- The word travel can be misleading here. Think of it instead as a short-term contract temp job. You just don’t get the same tax-free Per Diem allowance that can be available to you if you travel for your job, but you still get the great pay.
  3. Follow the needs – The shortage for all therapy positions (SLP, Physical Therapist, PTA, Occupational Therapist, and COTA) is so large and growing that you could easily just follow the needs around the country, from California one assignment to Wisconsin the next. Imagine the adventures you would have doing that for a couple of years before you settle down – if you still want to after traveling that is.

There you have it. Three magical ways to make short-term travel therapy jobs into a long-term travel rehab career.